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How plants survive the harsh environment of Australia

New book: Groom, P. K., and Lamont, B. B. (2015). Plant Life of Southwestern Australia. Adaptations for Survival. De Gruyter Open

Early explorers described Western Australia as ‘the most barren spot on the face of the earth’. In this book we learn that south-western Australia is one of the world’s biodiversity hotspots – not despite but because of its harsh environment. Nutrient-poor soils, frequent droughts, and recurrent fires, together with adverse fauna interactions (e.g., strong-billed cockatoos, voracious kangaroos, and the lack of efficient pollinating bees and hummingbirds) have made this region the perfect evolutionary scenario for developing a plethora of plant adaptations and assembling an hyperdiverse flora. The authors nicely describe this scenario and offer an impressive wealth of knowledge on the natural history of the region in an attractive book with abundant tables and quality full-colour pictures. One of the strengths of the book is that it brings together both biotic and abiotic factors to explain biodiversity, something uncommon in most specialised books.

Overall this is a must-read book for Australian naturalists but will also be a key reference for international ecologists interested in how plants thrive and evolve in dry, nutrient-poor, fire-prone environments. The lessons learned from this region help us understand evolutionary pathways in other dry regions worldwide.

Groom-Lamont

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